Sigurwana’s Water Scorpions

While out on a walk around Sigurwana we found this little fellow in a small pool of water. This is known as a Water Scorpion.

There is approximately 150 species of aquatic invertebrates of the family Nepidae (order Hemiptera). The water scorpion resembles a land scorpion in certain ways: it has scythe like front legs adapted for seizing prey and a long, thin, whiplike structure at its posterior end. This “tail,” made up of two attached respiratory tubes, is extended above the surface of the water, enabling the animal to take in air.

The bite of the water scorpion is painful but is far less harmful to humans than the sting of the true scorpion.

Water scorpions are able to swim by moving their front legs up and down and kicking the middle and hind pairs. The latter two sets of legs are also used for crawling.
Found worldwide, water scorpions live primarily along the bottom edges of ditches and muddy ponds, where they hide among dead, water-logged leaves and other plant debris to ambush prey. They rarely move about in open water because they are poor swimmers. Adults lay their eggs in the crevices of debris and on the stalks of water plants.

Water Scorpion found in Sigurwana Streams
Water Scorpion at Sigurwana on the Soutpansberg Mountain Range

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